Taking the “Finicky” Out of Your Feline

Taking the “Finicky” Out of Your Feline

A well-balanced and properly formulated diet can make a world of difference when it comes to your pet’s health.

I discovered this first-hand a few years ago when my cat, Adelaide, was urinating around the house. It was behaviour that was so out of character for her that I knew she was trying to tell me something. It took a few urine samples and some x-rays, but she was soon diagnosed with bladder stones. She was quickly booked in for a cystotomy (surgery to remove the stones) and recovered very well.

She settled back in at home and was happily using her litterbox again. However, her treatment was not quite finished yet. The doctor’s wanted to make sure that she did not suffer a repeat of her experience. The stones collected from her bladder were sent out for proper identification, and a new food that was specifically designed for cats with urinary issues was recommended. I was, of course, eager to oblige. Anything for my little kitty! Addie, on the other hand, was not so excited for her new food…

Introducing a cat to a new food can certainly be a challenge.

As I immediately discovered, cats can be very picky when it comes to their diet. And, I have to admit, I hear from owner’s all the time at the clinic that their cat’s are very fussy eaters – I just never thought it would be a challenge that I would have to face myself! Luckily, I had the support of my fellow staff members at Snelgrove Vet, as well as a team of veterinarians. Through the experience of having to switch a (then) 10-year old cat to a brand new food, I learned a lot of tips and tricks, which I can now share with our readers and clients alike!

Offering your cat a variety of foods while they’re still young can make your life a lot easier in the long-run.

If I had been doing this since she was a kitten, I don’t think Addie would have had a difficult time transitioning from her old food to her new urinary food. Cats often become conditioned to eating only one type of food and, because they like to stick with the familiar, it can be difficult to change foods later on if necessary. This is especially true of lower quality dry and canned foods (some are the equivalent of having a cheeseburger with fries everyday. Tastes great but not great for you!) It is a good idea to introduce your cat to all different kinds of  textures while they are still young enough to be willing to try them. Of course, I was not forward thinking enough to do this when she was younger.

Preparing for the transition from old food to new food took some consideration.

Before I could transition Addie to her new and amazing urinary food, there were a few things I needed to put into practice first. I had to get her off of free-feeding and establish a feeding schedule. She was so used to grazing from her bowl whenever she wanted that I was afraid she would turn her nose up at her new food and hold out for her old food. I had to start feeding her at specific times so that she would be hungry by the time I was filling her bowl again. I also had to eliminate any hint of her old food from the house. Some very clever kitties think that they can hold out for their old food and eventually get it, especially if they can see or smell the bag or can. So, I took her old bag of food out to the garage so that she would not be able to sniff it out. I did keep it on hand, just in case I needed it though.*

Waiting (not so) patiently for dinner

Transitioning to new food took a little bit of time and a lot of patience.

Cats are usually very particular about their eating habits, and my Adelaide is no exception. In order to allow myself the greatest chance of success, I had to make sure that I didn’t make any “environmental” changes to her routine. I fed her in the same spot within our home, out of the same bowl, with the same scoop, at the same time of day – the only change was to the food itself, nothing else. Finally, we were ready to break out the new food! Sometimes all it takes is a bit of time for a cat to accept a new type of food, so I started feeding a mixture of 3/4 regular food and 1/4 new food for a few days. She seemed okay with this, so I began to mix the foods 1/2 and 1/2. When this went well for another few days, and I was able to feed a mixture of 1/4 old food and 3/4 new food, until I was finally able to eliminate her old food altogether from the bowl. The entire transition probably took about 8 or 9 days. Some cats may need more time, others may need less.

I was lucky that transitioning Adelaide to her new urinary diet went fairly smoothly. I think that approaching the food change with a well-thought out plan helped a lot. Hopefully my experiences can help other cat owners that are facing food transitions of their own! Of course, if any of our clients or readers have any questions or concerns, the staff at Snelgrove is always able to lend an ear and discuss some tips and tricks.

Thank you to everyone for reading, I would love to hear if anyone else has had any experiences with this. What helped the most with your transition, and what hindered it?

– Kait.

*Please note: At no time should a cat ever go more than 24 hours without eating. If your cat is truly considering a hunger strike and has refused to eat for 24 hours, call your veterinarian immediately as they may be in danger of developing health issues such as fatty liver disease, which can lead to renal failure.

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The Lowdown on Laser Therapy

The Lowdown on Laser Therapy

You may have heard about Laser Therapy in the past, or maybe not. Either way, let’s take a minute to shed some light (ha-ha) on what exactly laser therapy is, how it can benefit an animal and whether or not your pet is a candidate for it.

What is Laser Therapy?

It all sounds very advanced, but the truth is, laser therapy has actually been around for quite a while for both companion animal and human applications. Here at Snelgrove Vet, we are lucky enough to have a therapeutic laser on-hand for our patients. And it sure comes in handy! We use it all the time for our patients post-operatively – meaning, we treat the incision area after any type of surgery, even our routine surgeries like spays and neuters.

Laser Machine

This is our Companion Laser Therapy® system

“Laser” stands for Light Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation. It works by passing a laser beam across your pet’s skin, directly above any area of discomfort. The invisible beam of light passes energy to your pet’s cells, causing them to reproduce faster.

What are the Benefits of Laser Therapy?

Laser therapy can benefit an animal in many ways. When the energy from the laser is passed to the cells within the body and they reproduce faster, it encourages those cells to repair at a quicker pace. This aids in breaking up scar tissue, reducing inflammation and increasing circulation.

A laser therapy session is completely non-invasive and the animal will only feel a bit of heat from the beam of light. It is a pain-free way to help an animal heal faster and it will also reduce the chances of re-injury. If anything, it is a nice, relaxing session that most of our patients enjoy, much like we enjoy a massage.

Who is a Candidate for Laser Therapy?

Laser therapy has a broad range of applications. Beyond the obvious uses for wounds, trauma injuries, bone fractures and breaks, it is also a great way to battle signs of aging in your pet as well. It can help diminish joint stiffness, which allows animals to enjoy all the things they used to – from playing fetch to jumping up on the couch for a snuggle. If you notice your furry family member has been disinterested in playing or going for walks, it may just be the soreness and arthritis that comes with age that could be stopping them.

Truthfully, any animal can be a candidate for laser therapy. From young puppies and kittens recovering from their spays and neuters to older dogs and cats that are perhaps suffering from an injury, or even just plain “old age.”

For more information, please call Snelgrove Vet Services at (905) 846-3316 to book a consultation.