The flu, you and your dog

 

Canine influenza is typically one of two strains, H3N2 and H3N8.

H3N8 was first identified in the U.S.A. in 2004 and was believed to be a mutation from the equine virus of the same name.

Prior to 2015, H3N2 was thought to be restricted to South Korea, China and Thailand but following an outbreak in Chicago in 2015 was realized to be in the U.S.A as well.

Am I at risk of contracting this?

Both of these viruses pose no risk to humans at this time and although this virus is not widespread in Canada there have been confirmed cases in Windsor (Essex County) , Orillia (Simcoe – Muskoka) and the Northumberland area this year. We don’t want dog owners to be scared but be aware.

  • If your dog is sick, keep them away from others and vice versa.
  • If your dog shows any combination of these symptoms, coughing, nasal discharge, fever, runny eyes or nose, please take them to your local veterinarian. (It is best to notify them that you are concerned about this. You will then typically be instructed to leave your pet in your vehicle until it is time to be seen by the veterinarian to limit exposure to other patients)
  • Wash your hands well and change your clothes if you believe you may have touched a sick dog to prevent you spreading it to others.

Should I vaccinate my dog(s)?

Although we don’t feel that the majority of our patients require vaccination for Canine Influenza at this time, we do want you to make an informed choice. It is what is referred to as a  ‘lifestyle’ vaccine that makes specific patients more likely to at some point come in contact with this virus.

  • traveling in areas with confirmed cases
  • attending dog shows
  • obedience trials
  • doggy sporting events
  • off-leash dog parks
  • boarding facilities
  • training facilities

Certain dogs may also be at a higher risk.

  • elderly dogs
  • dogs with respiratory or cardiac disease
  • Bulldogs, pugs, pekingnese and other brachycephalic breeds (dogs with ‘pushed-in’ noses)

This vaccine does need a booster vaccination 2-4 weeks after the initial and then it becomes a yearly vaccine. It does also take approximately 2 weeks after the 2nd vaccine before immunity is developed. Please keep that in mind with any upcoming travel plans.

Feel free to contact Snelgrove Veterinary Services in Brampton at 905-846-3316 or your local veterinarian for more information.

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